THE AKTIPAK DIFFERENCE

A FRESH MIX

FOR ACNE

A FLEXIBLE AND CONVENIENT OPTIONTO GO WITH YOUR ACTIVE LIFESTYLE

A unique way of mixing two therapies:

TWO ACTIVES IN ONE TREATMENT

Two ingredients are separated in a dual-chamber pouch until you mix them before application.1

No mixing needed in the pharmacy.2,3

PORTABILITY AND
CONVENIENCE

Who wants to carry around pumps, jars, or tubes of acne medication? Pocket-sized pouches (1.5″x2.5″) of Aktipak can easily be tucked away. Each carton of Aktipak has 60 pouches,1 so you can divide them up for on-the-go use wherever you are.

YOU MIX IT FRESH
ON THE GO

You’ll know it’s fresh because you mix the ingredients in the palm of your hand right before applying. And with a shelf life of 18 months from the time of manufacture, you don’t have to worry about your product expiring too soon.4

Portability is key with AKTIPAK - take it anywhere with you.

HOW

AKTIPAK WORKS

Each dual-chamber pouch of Aktipak separates its two established medicines until you’re ready to mix them yourself at the moment of application: erythromycin and benzoyl peroxide.1

ERYTHROMYCIN – An antibiotic that demonstrates antibacterial activity against P. acnes, the bacteria responsible for acne.1,2,5,6

BENZOYL PEROXIDE – An antibacterial with activity against P. acnes. It works in combination with erythromycin to treat acne.2,5,7-11

These medicines work together to treat whiteheads, blackheads, and pimples.5,9-11

At 8 Weeks, over twice as many patients experienced treatment success.

Patients in an Aktipak clinical trial were 13 years of age or older with moderate to moderately severe acne. This means that they had 15 to 80 pimples and 20 to 140 whiteheads and/or blackheads with an overall acne severity score of 1.5 or greater on the Physician’s Global Acne Severity Scale before they started the trial. During the trial patients applied either Aktipak Gel or a gel with no medicine to their face twice daily (morning and evening) for 8 weeks.1,2
Treatment success was defined as achieving a Physician’s Global Acne Severity Scale score of 0 or 0.5 on a scale of 0 to 4 at the end of the study. A score of 0 or 0.5 meant that the patient’s facial skin was either clear or had a small number of whiteheads and/or blackheads with few or no pimples.1,2

Basketball player with acne using AKTIPAK

SAVE ON AKTIPAK

Ask your doctor about how to save on Aktipak.
If you have commercially available insurance, you may be eligible for an Aktipak discount.

HOW TO

MIX FRESH

Each single Aktipak pouch has premeasured acne medication – one easy-to-use treatment that takes just a few seconds to apply.1

HOW TO MIX FRESH: CLICK TO WATCH VIDEO.

Step 1a: TEAR a the portable AKTIPAK treatment package.
Step 1b: or CUT the AKTIPAK portable treatment packet.
Step 2: SQUEEZE out the AKTIPAK contents into the palm of your hand.
Step 3: BLEND the AKTIPAK treatment in your hand using 5-10 circles.

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

AKTIPAK (erythromycin and benzoyl peroxide) Gel, 3%/5% is a prescription medicine used on the skin (topical) for the treatment of acne vulgaris in patients 12 years of age and older. It is not known if AKTIPAK is safe or effective for children younger than 12 years of age.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Do not take AKTIPAK if you are allergic to any of its ingredients. Symptoms of an allergic reaction could include rash or itching, swelling of the face, tongue or mouth, or trouble breathing. Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if you are not sure if you are allergic to the ingredients.

Precautions:

  • Apply AKTIPAK to your skin
  • Do not get AKTIPAK Gel in your mouth, eyes, vagina, or on your lips.
  • If you are taking any other acne medications, tell your doctor. Skin irritation may occur if used with other topical medications, especially medicines that are abrasive or cause your skin to flake or peel. If skin irritation is severe, stop using AKTIPAK and speak with your doctor.
  • The use of antibiotic agents may make room for other bacteria to grow that are not affected by AKTIPAK. This could lead to an infection. If this occurs, discontinue use and speak with your doctor.

Pregnancy and Nursing Mothers:

It is not known if AKTIPAK can harm your unborn baby. Talk to your doctor if you are pregnant, or may become pregnant. It is not known if both active ingredients of AKTIPAK pass into your breastmilk, so if you are breastfeeding, please talk to your doctor.

Exposure to Sunlight:

Excessive or prolonged exposure to sunlight should be limited. To minimize exposure to sunlight, a hat or other clothing should be worn.

Most common side effects include:

  • Dry or itchy skin
  • Skin rash or your skin may become red, itchy, or swollen
  • Eyelid redness
  • Sensitivity to sunlight. Limit your time in the sun

If any side effects occur, talk to your doctor or pharmacist immediately.

Please see full Prescribing Information and Important Safety Information. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs. Visit http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch/default.htm or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

References: 

1. Aktipak (erythromycin 3%-benzoyl peroxide 5%) Topical Gel [package insert]. Wayne, PA: Cutanea Life Sciences, Inc.; 2017. 2. Jones T, Mark L, Monroe E, Weiss J, Levy S. A multicenter, double-blind, parallel-group study to evaluate 3% erythromycin/5% benzoyl peroxide dual-pouch pack for acne vulgaris. Clin Drug Invest. 2002;22(7):455-462. 3. Thiboutot D, Jarratt M, Rich P, Rist T, Rodriguez D, Levy S. A randomized, parallel, vehicle-controlled comparison of two erythromycin/benzoyl peroxide preparations for acne vulgaris. Clin Ther. 2002;24(5):773-785. 4. Data on file. Cutanea Life Sciences, Inc. 2017. 5. Motaparthi K, Hsu S. Topical antibacterial agents. In: Wolverton S. Comprehensive Dermatologic Drug Therapy. 3rd ed. Amsterdam: Elsevier/Saunders; 2012:452-455. 6. Erythromycin: pharmacology and biochemistry. PubChem website. https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/erythromycin#section=Pharmacology-and-Biochemistry&fullscreen=true. Accessed January 31, 2017. 7. Benzoyl peroxide: pharmacology and biochemistry. PubChem website. https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/
benzoyl_peroxide#section=Pharmacology-and-Biochemistry&fullscreen=true. Accessed January 31, 2017. 8. Eady EA, Farmery MR, Ross JI, Cove JH, Cunliffe WJ. Effects of benzoyl peroxide and erythromycin alone and in combination against antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant skin bacteria from acne patients. Br J Dermatol. 1994;131:331-336. 9. Eady EA, Bojar RA, Jones CE, Cove JH, Holland KT, Cunliffe WJ. The effects of acne treatment with a combination of benzoyl peroxide and erythromycin on skin carriage of erythromycin-resistant propionibacteria. Br J Dermatol. 1996;134:107-113. 10. Zaenglein AL, Pathy AL, Schlosser BJ, et al. Guidelines of care for the management of acne vulgaris. J Am Acad Dermatol. 74(5);2016:945-973.e33. 11. Alvarez-Sánchez M, Rodríguez-Ayala E, Ponce-Olivera RM, Tirado-Sánchez A, Arellano-Mendoza MI. ¿Resistencia en el acne? Un metaanálisis a propósito de la controversia. Cirugía y Cirujanos. 2016: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.circir:2015.08.005.