THE AKTIPAK DIFFERENCE

ON-THE-GO ACNE THERAPY FOR

ACTIVE PATIENTS

PORTABLE,
POCKET-SIZED
DUAL-CHAMBER
POUCH
  • Each single-dose pouch contains erythromycin and benzoyl peroxide in separate chambers2
  • Pouches (1.5″ x 2.5″) tuck discreetly into purses, backpacks, gym bags, etc. for simple, convenient,
    on-the-go use
  • One carton provides 60 individual pouches2
FRESHLY MIXED,
PATIENT-BLENDED
THERAPY
  • Patient blends contents immediately prior to use
  • No mixing needed in the pharmacy 3,4

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ENABLES SIMPLE, CONVENIENT,
ON-THE-GO USE WHEREVER THEY ARE3

Portable pocket-sized AKTIPAK acne therapy packets.

EFFICACY

A UNIQUE WAY OF

MIXING TWO
THERAPIES

The combination of
3% Erythromycin and
5% Benzoyl Peroxide:

  • Demonstrates keratolytic,
    anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial properties5-7
  • In vitro data suggest that an antibiotic/BPO combination may reduce development of strains of P. acnes resistant to the antibiotic8-11

Female AKTIPAK acne therapy user hailing a cab.

OVER TWICE THE
TREATMENT SUCCESS

VERSUS VEHICLE CONTROL

TREATMENT SUCCESS AT 8 WEEKS2 

Treatment success, defined by Physician’s Global Acne Severity Scores of 0 or 0.5, was significantly higher for the EBP group compared with the VC group after
8 weeks of treatment (p < 0.05)2,3

Percentage of acne patients with treatment success (score of 0 or 0.5 on the Physician’s Global Acne Severity Scale) *p < 0.05 vs vehicle control (based on Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel, stratified by site).
EBP = 3% erythromycin/5% benzoyl peroxide dual-pouch pack; VC = vehicle control.
Results of a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group study comparing the efficacy and tolerability of Aktipak with its matching vehicle control in patients 13 years and older for the treatment of acne vulgaris. The primary efficacy evaluations were lesion reductions from baseline and treatment success at 8 weeks.2,3
aCompared to vehicle alone at 8 weeks.

TOLERABILITY

A WELL-TOLERATED

MIX2-4

No patients discontinued treatment with Aktipak during
clinical trials due to treatment-related adverse events.3,4

During clinical trials, 550 acne patients were studied. Of these patients, 236 were treated with Aktipak. The most frequently reported adverse event considered at least possibly related was dry skin (7.6%). Application site reactions (stinging, burning sensation, tingling, erythema) were reported in 2.5% of patients. Blepharitis, pruritus, and photosensitivity reactions were reported in < 2% of patients.

Basketball player AKTIPAK acne therapy treatment user.

TELL YOUR PATIENTS HOW THEY CAN SAVE ON AKTIPAK

Patients with commercially available insurance might be eligible to save on Aktipak.
Find out more from your Aktipak representative by calling 1-844-780-8152.

EASY MIXING

A FRESH MIX

FOR YOUR ACTIVE PATIENTS

HOW TO MIX FRESH: CLICK TO WATCH VIDEO.

Step 1: TEAR the AKTIPAK portable acne therapy packet.
Step 1b: or CUT the portable AKTIPAK acne therapy packet.
Step 2: SQUEEZE out the AKTIPAK acne therapy contents into the palm of your hand.
Step 3: BLEND the AKTIPAK acne therapy contents using 5-10 circular motions.

INDICATIONS AND USAGE

AKTIPAK (erythromycin and benzoyl peroxide) Gel, 3%/5% is indicated for the topical treatment of acne vulgaris.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

Contraindications: AKTIPAK is contraindicated in those individuals who have shown hypersensitivity to any of its components.
Precautions: For topical use only; not for ophthalmic use. Concomitant topical acne therapy should be used with caution because a possible cumulative irritancy effect may occur, especially with the use of peeling, desquamating or abrasive agents. If severe irritation develops, discontinue use and institute appropriate therapy. The use of antibiotic agents may be associated with the overgrowth of nonsusceptible organisms. If this occurs, discontinue use and take appropriate measures. Avoid contact with eyes and all mucous membranes.
Pregnancy: It is not known whether AKTIPAK can cause fetal harm when administered to a pregnant woman. AKTIPAK should be given to a pregnant woman only if clearly needed. It is not known whether the ingredients of AKTIPAK are excreted in human milk. Therefore, caution should be exercised when erythromycin is administered to a nursing woman.
Pediatric Use: The safety and effectiveness of AKTIPAK in pediatric patients below 12 years of age have not been established.
Adverse Reactions: The most frequently reported adverse events reported in clinical trials include: dry skin, application site reaction, blepharitis, pruritus, and photosensitivity.
Please see accompanying full Prescribing Information and Important Safety Information. You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch/default.htm or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

References: 

1. Data on file. Cutanea Life Sciences, Inc. 2017. 2. Aktipak™ (erythromycin 3%-benzoyl peroxide 5%) Topical Gel [package insert]. Wayne, PA: Cutanea Life Sciences, Inc.; 2017. 3. Jones T, Mark L, Monroe E, Weiss J, Levy S. A multicenter, double-blind, parallel-group study to evaluate 3% erythromycin/5% benzoyl peroxide dual-pouch pack for acne vulgaris. Clin Drug Invest. 2002;22(7):455-462. 4. Thiboutot D, Jarratt M, Rich P, Rist T, Rodriguez D, Levy S. A randomized, parallel, vehicle-controlled comparison of two erythromycin/benzoyl peroxide preparations for acne vulgaris. Clin Ther. 2002;24(5):773-785. 5. Motaparthi K, Hsu S. Topical antibacterial agents. In: Wolverton S. Comprehensive Dermatologic Drug Therapy. 3rd ed. Amsterdam: Elsevier/Saunders; 2012:452-455. 6. Erythromycin: pharmacology and biochemistry. PubChem website.https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/erythromycin#section=Pharmacology-
and-Biochemistry&fullscreen=true. Accessed January 31, 2017. 7. Benzoyl peroxide: pharmacology and biochemistry. PubChem website. https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/
benzoyl_peroxide#section=Pharmacology-and-Biochemistry&fullscreen=true. Accessed January 31, 2017. 8. Zaenglein AL, Pathy AL, Schlosser BJ, et al. Guidelines of care for the management of acne vulgaris. J Am Acad Dermatol. 74(5);2016:945-973.e33. 9. Eady EA, Farmery MR, Ross JI, Cove JH, Cunliffe WJ. Effects of benzoyl peroxide and erythromycin alone and in combination against antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant skin bacteria from acne patients. Br J Dermatol. 1994;131:331-336. 10. Eady EA, Bojar RA, Jones CE, Cove JH, Holland KT, Cunliffe WJ. The effects of acne treatment with a combination of benzoyl peroxide and erythromycin on skin carriage of erythromycin-resistant propionibacteria. Br J Dermatol. 1996;134:107-113. 11. Alvarez-Sánchez M, Rodríguez-Ayala E, Ponce-Olivera RM, Tirado-Sánchez A, Arellano-Mendoza MI. ¿Resistencia en el acne? Un metaanálisis a propósito de la controversia. Cirugía y Cirujanos. 2016: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.circir:2015.08.005.